Results tagged ‘ Mike Trout ’

Mike Trout and the More Than $140MM Gamble

When we go to Las Vegas, one of the games we always look for is the Deal or No Deal interactive game. Not the slot machine, but the one where you have to spin the wheel and land on the briefcase in order to play the actual Deal or No Deal game. Once you start playing and you make your arrangement with the banker for a deal, at the end you have the chance to play Double or Nothing. You don’t have to play it, you can just take your guaranteed money and get the heck out of there despite the prospect of being that much richer. Mike Trout took his guaranteed money and got the heck out of there. While the metaphor to the game suggests Mike Trout could have got “nothing,” I know that’s not true at all, I just wanted to talk about the Deal or No Deal game. Trout could have earned in the neighborhood of $40-$60 million through arbitration, and after that is now anybody’s guess. If you’re paying the healthy Mike Trout of now to a free agent contract, maybe you go with a ten-year, $350 million deal and become a free agent at 36. Instead, Mike Trout signs a six-year extension worth $144.5 million and will become a free agent at 29.

I like Rosenthal’s point about the last three years of Trout’s contract, and while it’s nowhere near close to paying the $5-6 million per Wins Above Replacement might deserve in this current market, it sure as heck is a pretty darn good payday. If you went by the $ per WAR method, Trout’s market value would be in the $50-60MM a year range, which is stupid money, but it’s an idea of how good he’s been.

That Mike Trout will become a Free Agent at 29 instead of 26 did make some on social media upset Friday afternoon and evening, noting how big of a payday Trout could have missed (double the guaranteed money, $200MM more guaranteed money). While I agree he probably missed a PowerBall-sized payday, anybody that’s been paying attention to contract signings know that even if you’re in your thirties, teams will have no problem signing you to an irresponsibly large deal. Isn’t that right, Miguel Cabrera? Now, it’s not Miguel Cabrera’s fault the Detroit Tigers wanted to throw that money at him. Someone offers you that kind of guaranteed money to play baseball going into your age 31 season, you take it. With Mike Trout, the decision was a little more difficult at age 22. Even if Trout plays as 80% of the player he is now for the next six years, you don’t think the market will pony up a ten-year deal? Front offices don’t judge players by runs, runs batted in, and probably have better metrics than batting average to use, so they’ll take a look at the whole package. Hopefully, we’re beginning to be witnesses to one of the Top 15 MLB position player careers ever, and if that’s the player Trout becomes, he’s going to deserve a big ton of money at age 29.

I’d be worried for Trout if baseball were on the decline, but as it catches up to American Football in revenues, I think as long as Mike Trout keeps playing baseball at a Hall of Fame level, he’s getting his now and will continue to cash in later. What would have been interesting in addition to the contract Trout would have received at 26 would have been the contract he would have also received in his late-30’s. That’s probably a topic for the off-season when news slows way down, or in thirteen years when I’m in my forties. Oh my gosh, I’m going to be in my forties in thirteen years.

Water Cooler Day Off Talk: My May 23rd All Star Ballot

Earlier I wrote about how you could validate voting for each Giant on the MLB All Star Ballot, now it’s probably an appropriate time to list my actual All Stars. Since voting doesn’t close until the 4th of July, there’s going to be plenty of room for hot streaks, and hot piles of slumps. As with the online ballot itself, I’ll give you my players for each position, and we’ll leave it at that for now.

American League

C — Carlos Santana (8 HR, .405 OBP, .410 wOBA, 163 wRC+, 1.7 fWAR) over Joe Mauer (2 HR, .416 OBP, .386 wOBA, 144 wRC+, 1.9 fWAR)

1B — Chris Davis (14 HR, .420 OBP, .458 wOBA, 190 wRC+, 2.3 fWAR)

2B — Dustin Pedroia (8 SB, .420 OBP, .375 wOBA, 132 wRC+, 2.0 fWAR) just over Robinson Cano (13 HR, .335 OBP, .375 wOBA, 134 wRC+, 1.6 fWAR)

SS — Jhonny Peralta (4 HR, .379 OBP, .364 wOBA, 127 wRC+, 1.7 fWAR)

3B — Miguel Cabrera (13 HR, .459 OBP, .480 wOBA, 206 wRC+, 3.0 fWAR) over Evan Longoria (9 HR, .399 OBP, .420 wOBA, 171 wRC+, 2.9 fWAR)

OF — Mike Trout (9 HR, 9 SB, .400 wOBA, 157 wRC+, 2.4 fWAR)

OF — Jose Bautista (11 HR, .408 wOBA, 158 wRC+, 1.9 fWAR)

OF — Alex Rios (10 HR, 8 SB, .372 OBP, .397 wOBA, 146 wRC+, 1.7 fWAR) just over Alex Gordon (6 HR, .387 OBP, .396 wOBA, 150 wRC+, 1.9 fWAR)

DH — David Ortiz (7 HR, .397 OBP, .429 wOBA, 168 wRC+, 1.1 fWAR)

National League

C — Buster Posey (6 HR, .395 OBP, .385 wOBA, 152 wRC+, 1.8 fWAR)

1B — Joey Votto (7 HR, .484 OBP, .438 wOBA, 182 wRC+, 2.7 fWAR) over Paul Goldschmidt (12 HR, .400 OBP, .420 wOBA, .166 wRC+, 2.1 fWAR)

2B — Matt Carpenter (3 HR, .387 OBP, .365 wOBA, 137 wRC+, 2.1 fWAR) over Marco Scutaro (1 HR, .382 OBP, .358 wOBA, 133 wRC+, 1.6 fWAR)

SS — Jean Segura (7 HR, 14 SB, .390 OBP, .407 wOBA, 2.4 fWAR) just over former Long Beach State Dirtbag Troy Tulowitzki (9 HR, .409 OBP, .427 wOBA, 163 wRC+, 2.3 fWAR). You could go either way here.

3B — David Wright (6 HR, 10 SB, .395 OBP, .385 wOBA, 151 wRC+, 2.1 fWAR) over Chase Headley (does not play on the Mets)

OF — Carlos Gonzalez (11 HR, 8 SB, .390 OBP, .413 wOBA, 154 wRC+, 2.1 fWAR)

OF — Justin Upton (14 HR, .387 OBP, .410 wOBA, 165 wRC+, 2.0 fWAR)

OF — Shin-Soo Choo (9 HR, .449 OBP, .426 wOBA, 174 wRC+, 2.0 fWAR) over Carlos Gomez (152 wRC+, 2.6 fWAR) and Ryan Braun (9 HR, .412 wOBA). Just don’t put Choo in CF.

Feel free to put your ballot or changes in the comments because I can see how you might like player B over player A. Short season so far, lots of time left before I have to decide who I’m voting in 35 times.

Postseason and Award Predictions: Don’t Worry, They’ll Be Wrong

The regular season begins this Sunday tomorrow at 5:05PM PST when the Texas Rangers play the Houston Astros in that famous AL West rivalry, which means this week is all about previews, bold predictions, and message board put downs. I will say I am not good at predicting things, so let’s get that straight. Like everybody else though, I have an opinion on the matter of how events will play out.  Let us preview the postseason, where the best team doesn’t always win due to the randomness of how the short series will go. It’s a first team to eleven wins once the DS begins, and normally the team that catches fire tends to do the celebrating. Also in my analysis, the team that scores more runs tend to win games. I’ll start with who I have going into the playoffs, then the predictions of the resulting postseason series. After that, I’ll go into regular season awards.

NL Playoff Seeding

1. Washington Nationals

2. Cincinnati Reds

3. Los Angeles Dodgers

4. Atlanta Braves

5. San Francisco Giants

Wild-Card Play-in Game

Atlanta beats San Francisco

NLDS

Atlanta beats Washington

Cincinnati beats Los Angeles

NLCS

Cincinnati beats Atlanta

AL Playoff Seeding

1. Detroit Tigers

2. Toronto Blue Jays

3. Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

4. Tampa Bay Rays

5. Texas Rangers

Wild-Card Play-in Game

Tampa Bay beats Texas

ALDS

Detroit beats Tampa Bay

Toronto beats LA of A

ALCS

Detroit beats Toronto

World Series (game will be in AL Park when AL wins ASG)

Detroit beats Cincinnati

Don’t worry Tiger fans, I’m sure my predictions won’t be correct!

—————————

Regular Season Awards

I will go into who the MVP, Cy Young, and Rookie of the Year for both leagues will be. These will also probably be wrong.

AL MVP — Mike Trout

Asking me if I’m mad, bro? Nah, not mad, but let’s say Mike Trout does even 80% of what he did in 2012 in 2013, and his team gets to the playoffs, the voters are going to give him his “redemption,” and feel good that “see, we don’t hate advanced stats,” as we roll our collective eyes together. Sophomore slump? Maybe a little, but the only thing that will stop this fish is if he gets hurt playing the game.

NL MVP — Justin Upton

They say a change of scenery can do wonders for a player, and how about playing with an organization that wants you? I’d say that’s a good start. I think Upton will have a career year, players like Braun and Posey will regress a little, and Upton will find his team in the playoffs. Justin Upton may not have the best year of everybody, but I think he gets the award.

AL Cy Young — Justin Verlander

Kind of like Trout, he’s only going to get stopped by an injury. He should continue to rack up the pitcher wins, satisfying the old school, and his team will make the playoffs all with lots of money, and lots of strikeouts. Probably not many multi-homer against games though. Verlander is just excellent.

NL Cy Young — Clayton Kershaw

Dickey was a great story in 2012, but I still side with the overall metrics a bit on Kershaw, believing he got snubbed by just a little bit, nothing too controversial. Kershaw, like Verlander, will be getting plenty of pitcher wins behind a boosted offense, and he’s still really, really good. Oh, and his team will be going to the playoffs so that equals instant votes.

AL Rookie of the Year — Jackie Bradley Jr. 

Shot up the prospect lists in 2012 into 2013, and is projected to start with the team. For the kid, the defense will be getting peoples attention, while the stick may not be able to do anything super special, it’ll be enough. Lots of names for both RoY awards, JBJ just happens to be my guess right now.

NL Rookie of the Year — Zack Wheeler

Wheeler will not come up until June and he’ll still get the award. Dominating the minors, and yes, I understand the pain he’s going to cause Giants fans, but the kid is good, and will be going after his opposition from the get-go with heat and curveballs and breaking balls and strikeouts.

Let’s hear what your predictions are! Pretty much anything goes before the season gets going.

The Best Individual Seasons of 2012: 1st through 20th

Idea: Rank the best individual seasons of the 2012 MLB regular season (Spring Training, Minor Leagues, and Postseason are not included), while considering offensive and defensive facets of the game.

Consider: Using the individual metrics to measure individual performance; full avoidance of projecting results for shortened seasons, and past years performance to justify or dictate standings.

This is not: “Most Valuable” anything. Rather, this is “best,” like Baseball America does, so there is no confusion as to what I am ranking. It is also not a “this is a ranking of who I want in 2013, or wanted in any other year.”

This is: My opinion, and will be disagreed with by many.

Intro

81-100

61-80

41-60

21-40

—————————

20. R.A. Dickey (233.2 IP, 8.86 K/9, 3.39 tERA, 4.6 fWAR, 5.6 rWAR) – Had I considered age in this ranking, maybe Dickey would have been higher, but I’ll let someone else do that ranking. I think it’s still cool that we could have some more years to experience his dominance over hitters though.

19. David Price (211.0 IP, 8.74 K/9, 3.23 tERA, 5.1 fWAR, 6.4 rWAR) – Really had trouble ranking 19-21 with the three pitchers, but in the end, I just liked Price’s numbers the best

18. Aaron Hill (26 HR, 14 SB, .375 wOBA, 6.2 fWAR, 4.6 rWAR) – What a change of scenery can do for you, Aaron Hill looks like he’s found his comfort zone in Phoenix after being traded from Toronto.

17. Cliff Lee (211.0 IP, 1.19 BB/9, 3.21 tERA, 4.9 fWAR, 4.2 rWAR) – Poor Clifton didn’t get a lot of love because of the W-L record he sported, but it’s not his fault his team didn’t score runs for him, even if he was on for most of the season.

16. Michael Bourn (26 2B, 42 SB, .326 wOBA, 6.4 fWAR, 6.0 rWAR) – The speedy center fielder does his job tearing up the basepaths and covering his part out in CF. Jim Bowman suggested the Giants could be a fit, I think not. ($)

15. Felix Hernandez (232.0 IP, 8.65 K/9, 3.21 tERA, 6.1 fWAR, 4.6 rWAR) – The King may be the only true royalty in Seattle now, but he should have an army of arms coming to help out soon.

14. Aramis Ramirez (27 HR, 50 2B, .384 wOBA, 6.5 fWAR, 5.4 rWAR) – May be the most underappreciated season of the guys listed in this top percentage, but the BBWAA recognized it, and he finished 9th in NL MVP voting.

13. Yadier Molina (22 HR, 12 SB, .375 wOBA, 6.5 fWAR, 6.7 rWAR) – I know what you’re thinking: A Molina that steals bases, not just prevents SB? Yea, he does that, too.

12. Adrian Beltre (36 HR, 33 2B, .388 wOBA, 6.5 fWAR, 6.7 rWAR) – I felt Heyward edged the 3B of Texas in the way he manned his position, and in the way he contributed on the bases, but still a great year for the guy that loves the headrubs.

11. Jason Heyward (27 HR, 21 SB, .351 wOBA, 6.6 fWAR, 5.5 rWAR) – Should Heyward be able to step up his game to another level in his age 23 season, he could get real scary.

10. Clayton Kershaw (227.2 IP, 9.05 K/9, 2.95 tERA, 5.5 fWAR, 6.2 rWAR) – I also struggled between JV vs. CK, but in the end, felt other peripherals not listed evened things out, giving the edge to Justin over Clayton with IP being the tiebreaker.

9. Justin Verlander (238.1 IP, 9.03 K/9, 3.43 tERA, 6.8 fWAR, 7.5 rWAR) – I really struggled where to start to include the pitchers, but here seemed like a good spot. Verlander is still good.

8. Chase Headley (31 HR, 17 SB, .378 wOBA, 7.5 fWAR, 6.0 rWAR) – If this were a “best second half of 2012” post, Headley might be #1.

7. David Wright (21 HR, 15 SB, .376 wOBA, 7.8 fWAR, 6.7 rWAR) – If this were a “best first half of 2012” post, Wright might be #1.

6. Miguel Cabrera (44 HR, 40 2B, .417 wOBA, 7.1 fWAR, 6.9 rWAR) – The dude’s just oozing power, and while the change of positions is a great story, the playing of the position itself must be considered in this ranking.

5. Andrew McCutchen (31 HR, 20 SB, .403 wOBA, 7.4 fWAR, 7.0 rWAR) – Worthy of being on the cover of a video game, I’m just glad Pittsburgh has had someone to cheer about.

4. Robinson Cano (33 HR, 48 2B, .394 wOBA, 7.8 fWAR, 8.2 rWAR) – Aren’t the Yankees glad the Rangers took Joaquin Arias instead of this kid.

3. Ryan Braun (41 HR, 30 SB, .413 wOBA, 7.9 fWAR, 6.8 rWAR) – Probably got a lot of flack for the PED-related stuff at the end of the season in 2011, but a 40-30 season will never stop being impressive.

2. Buster Posey (24 HR, .406 wOBA, 8.0 fWAR, 7.2 rWAR) – It’s no secret that the catcher position is an incredibly important one, and when your backstop is producing at the levels Posey is, well that warrants some respect. Bias possible.

1. Mike Trout (30 HR, 49 SB,  .409 wOBA, 10.0 fWAR, 10.7 rWAR) – If 21 year olds are just getting started, in the Majors, it’s difficult to fathom where he goes from here.

The MVPs: And We Can Finally Move On

The National League was up first discussing guys like Ryan Braun, Buster Posey, and Yadier Molina were discussed by MLB Network, and Andrew McCutchen as well as Chase Headley had some discussion from the crowd in a very underrated and underreported race for the NL MVP. And it went to:

Buster Posey! Or as we like to call him around these parts: #MVPosey.

Posey garnered 27 of the 32 first place votes, and only one third place vote from a writer in Chicago. Half of his second-place votes came from Milwaukee voters who chose Braun for the MVP on their ballot. Posey was at a party for what he said was a charity event his wife was putting on. It is well recorded that in two of Buster’s three seasons, and in both of those seasons in which he’s been healthy, he has carried his team to the postseason, and the World Series where they would achieve the dream. As proud as I am to have this guy on the team I root fot most, the only thing I can think about right now is how that price tag of his is going up up up. No doubt it will be a goal of the ownership to make Posey a Giant for as long as possible whether it’s done taking out arbitration years to a monster contract, or taking it year-by-year and then signing the MVP to a monster contract.

Then there was the AL MVP, which wasn’t talked about that much so who cares who wins this one, right? Just foolin. Unfortunately this seemed to turn fans against each other and made for an “old school vs. new school” narrative that became nauseatingly old at a Billy Hamilton pace. In the end, let’s not forget the award does not change our opinion on these players and both of these guys are spectacular players for their teams and for baseball. And the much publicized result:

Of course my feeling is that the voters got it wrong, but this was an incredible time for baseball to become exposed to more advanced metrics than it probably cared for. The debate between the two is not over, but the writers have spoken for this year, and the title goes to the Triple Crown winner from Venezuela.

So now hopefully we can move on to talk about other baseball things, like how does our favorite team trade for Mike Trout. Go for it, Bleacher Report.

AL MVP Debate Without Using WAR

You shouldn’t have to do something like this, but the old school people seem to be refusing WAR like a teenager refuses their vegetables. So let me modify the argument a little bit just from the batter’s box WITHOUT using the hated “Wins Above Replacement.”

I just counted those stats each led in for your convenience, so you wouldn’t have to count. One might argue that from all these stats you look at that overall it’s kind of equal anyway, while Cabrera might have more favorable power numbers, it isn’t like one guy is blowing out the other… and where one is leading in an individual stat, you have an answer for it from the other guy. Lots of runs? Look at the RBI blowout! More total bases? How about all those double plays you grounded into? Look at how much he doubles! Look how he never triples! And so on. My only drawback to the whole argument is that the advanced stats at the bottom slightly favor Trout over Cabrera. I guess that’s where I really run into a brick wall with the people that hate WAR, because if they hate WAR, what will make them consider things like wOBA and wRC+, two other popular advanced metrics?

Oh well, I tried. And I totally forgot Cabrera has one more positional change for the betterment of his team than Trout does, ugh. What we should all agree on even with that team move though, is that the MVP is more than just what’s in the batter’s box, but it also considers other facets of the game. Clubhouse, OK, but baserunning and defense for sure, please, because that also is pretty important for a baseball player when considering the full body of work.

Bob Nightengale (@BNightengale) of USA Today: “Cabrera Pulling Away in MVP Race”

The AL MVP debate has become pretty polarizing, and in more than just a “our fanbase versus the world” type of debate, but one in which we argue with advanced statistics, the significance of play in later months when more people are paying attention, and changing positions for the possibility of a better outcome for your team. If you read Bob Nightengale’s article yesterday, then you have an inside look as to how the Miguel Cabrera for MVP camp is thinking. And as he and Buster Olney notes, a lot of players and coaches are pulling for him pretty hard him. Consider as Nightengale has said that Pablo, and Josh Hamilton have been texting him, and all-around nice guy Jim Thome has supported him, and of course teammates like Prince Fielder and Delmon Young on are his side, that should be no surprise whatsoever. Prince calls the fact we’re having the debate “embarrassing,” but I think he should be given a pass because he’s on the field with Cabrera. It’s not his job to go home and dissect the numbers.

Bob Nightengale though, is one of the national media members who is thinking like a uniformed player, and the people on Twitter tried last night to let him know his thinking was flawed. From the beginning:

“Pulling away” never shows up in his article, so I wonder if that’s an editor’s work, but Nightengale I doubt had any problem with the verbiage.

Confirmed: he thinks Miguel Cabrera is putting the bow on the present that is the MVP award. Also confirmed: he loves the triple crown.

I thought this was an excellent time for Bob to come out and make a Twitter-stance against Sabermetrics, but I believe he was busy watching the Tigers game at the time.

That highlighted tweet really is key to understand the Miguel Cabrera camp: stats in September are more important than any other month, therefore Trout < Cabrera.

And there’s no pressure in baseball games from April-July. Those high leverage at bats, on the basepaths, and moments in the field you had in those games? Sorry.

Sometimes when he’s not joking around, the @DodgersGM account makes solid points, and here was no exception.

Another point that is being argued. However, I would not go to say that the move is being penalized, but more that it is not being given much value. I don’t believe that constitutes for a “penalty” as a lot of people are suggesting.

It is not hard to understand any of the arguments Nightengale and people that reside in the same camp as he does is making — because I believe everybody started their careers of baseball analysis there — but they should be the basis for saying Miguel Cabrera has had a spectacular season, not for him being the MVP, because that belongs to Mike Trout. Let me link some articles to you, both from the pro-Trout and pro-Cabrera faction that I think try to do good work in giving the MVP to the logical choice.

What I’m Reading (Subscriptions might be required for the first and last articles)

Keith Law — Mike Trout is the only rational choice for AL MVP

Brian Kenny — The triple crown is nonsense

Bill Shaikin’s latest from the LA Times — Two camps stake out turf in Trout-Cabrera debate

Russell Carleton — A sabermetric case for Miguel Cabrera’s MVP Candidacy

The Month That Could Doom Trout’s MVP Bid

I want you to take a look at a month that could be the difference between Mike Trout winning the AL MVP, and him not winning: April. How can you call yourself an MVP candidate when you batted .091/.167/.182 in the first calendar month of the season? For a guy who’s calling card has been a mix of power and speed, he has no HR, and no SB in that month. Just. Horrible.

The All Star Game: Notes and Appreciation

Some of the awesomeness you get to take in today may be due to these guys, all first-timers to the All Star Game

Today is a showcase of talent. Not all of the best talent are here, but there’s still going to be some amazing players on display like there were in the Futures Game, except of course at the MLB level, where a lot of these guys have for the most part put it all together.

Jeff Passan’s piece on Mike Trout vs. Bryce Harper is something we probably don’t talk enough about, but the Giants have now had the opportunity to see both, and were we ever disappointed. Disappointed that they did so well against our teams, but as a baseball fan, blown away by the fact they’re only 20, and 19 years old, respectively and why the heck couldn’t do that at 19-20 years old :(

All told, there were 38 players named or voted to the All Star team for the National League, and 36 voted for the American League squad. 16 National Leaguers are taking part in their first ASG, and for around 10 of them, I’d say this is just the beginning for them. You’d think the American League would be full of non-newbies, but even they have 10 guys new to the festivities and fanfare, with maybe 6 of them figuring this will not be their last trip to the All Star rodeo.

If you add the years up for the number of ASG the rosters have played, you would get 194 ASG played between the 74 players on the roster. The AL has 112 of those years, averaging 3.1111111111111 ASG/player, while the NL only has 90, averaging 2.36842105 ASG/player. There are five players in the ASG that have made 7 or more ASG rosters, can you name them? Think about it… OK I tell you now: Beltran 7; Miguel Cabrera 7; Chipper 8; Papi 8; Jeter 13. The people love them some gift baskets.

A Melky Cabrera homecoming should be heartwarming because Melky’s on record saying he did enjoy his time there, and Royals fans love the guy on their roster as they showed with Wil Myers (oh you thought I was going to talk about someone else, didn’t you?). Chipper Jones should have a nice final All Star Game, whether he plays or not, while Japan should be abuzz that Yu Darvish has the possibility of strutting his stuff on the international stage. Names like Chris Sale, Mark Trumbo, Aroldis Chapman, and Andrew McCutchen should hopefully become bigger household names as I believe all are special players.

So while we may be upset that the likes of Ryan Vogelsong, James McDonald, Johnny Cueto, and even yes, my favorite reliever, Sergio Romo did not make the squad, and others are upset over Matt Cain being chosen over R.A. Dickey and Stephen Strasburg, this should still be an excellent display of the talent that is flourishing within The Show. If you’re going to spend the whole time fuming of this or that, your appreciation for what’s being put out on stage tonight will likely go down, and as a baseball fan, this should be a moment for you to soak it all in, and appreciate some of what today’s game has to offer.

#SFGiants (37-30) vs. #Angels (36-31) Series Preview

You may find this to be a little fishy (get it?), Mark Trumbo is the guy I’m telling you to watch out for.

If you’re like my finacee, the biggest problem you have with the Angels is that they have the city name “Los Angeles” in front of their name when they are clearly in Orange County and the only thing Los Angeles-y about them is that they love the wave, and they’re surrounded by freeways. Their fans drench the seats in red better than the Doyers do in blue, which is kind of cool, and they got a rock in LCF, which I would probably understand if I’d just taken the ballpark tour. Just because this team can never pass the Rangers, don’t think they’re no good, because they are certainly capable.

Monday, June 18th: RHP Matt Cain vs. RHP Jerome Williams (yes, that Jerome Williams)

One sentence preview: The Angels are about to get Matt Cain’d as many focus on the consecutive batters retired streak of Cain’s.

Tuesday, June 19th: LHP Barry Zito vs. LHP C.J. Wilson

One sentence preview: This may be the pitching mismatch of the series, and I doubt there will be a blister on C.J.’s finger to save the Giants from facing him.

Wednesday, June 20th: RHP Ryan Vogelsong vs. **RHP Jared Weaver

One sentence preview: I’ll be at this game, guys, so don’t worry about it,no matter who the Angels decide to put out there.

The Angels’ Bullpen Guide

Things may be going well for the Giants (or we’re getting blown out) if you see: Hisanori Takahashi, David Pauley, or David Carpenter

Runs might be tougher to come by against: Jason Isringhausen, LaTroy Hawkins, Jordan Walden, Scott Downs, Ernesto Frieri (former Padre)

Small Sample Sizes (SSS) and the 2012 Season for the Bats

While Mike Trout (.396 wOBA, 6 HR, 16 SB, 13.3 wRAA) or some “Pujols” guy (.320 wOBA, 10 HR) you’ve heard of may be the biggest names on the offensive side of the halo, you’d be silly to overlook the strong Mark Trumbo (.418 wOBA, 15 HR, 19.2 wRAA) who is warranting some serious All Star consideration. Erick Aybar hasn’t been doing so bad the past 7 days (.457 wOBA) but with a.467 BABIP and a 7.1 LD% rate, don’t be surprised if Mr. New Contract cools off. Alberto Callaspo (.372 wOBA L7) hasn’t been doing so bad himself lately, but him and Aybar have .286 and .264 wOBA, respectively, so Alberto may just be having one of those times right now.

How’s this for your SSS: in the last 7 games, your 3 highest wOBA on the Giants belong to the BBB: Brandon Belt (.572 L7, .335 overall), Brandon Crawford (.457, .261), and Buster Posey (.434, .357). Melky (35.3%), Pablo (35%), and Belt (35.3%) are all scorching the ball with line drives in their last seven. On the opposite side of things, Angel Pagan hasn’t been producing too much lately (.192 wOBA, .231 BABIP, -2.1 wRAA, 14 wRC+) in his last 7 but maybe some warmer weather will change things up for Mr. Pagan.

Series Prediction

Monday: Giants win (Matt Cain. Any questions?)

Tuesday: Angels win (Although it’d be great if C.J. Wilson could regress to Barry Zito levels for a game)

Wednesday: Giants win in extra innings (Los Angeles and Orange Counties figuring out this Ryan Vogelsong guy is pretty good, while San Francisco gets to see for themselves how good Jared Weaver is)

I know I never predict the Giants lose a series, but with the pitching they throw out there, why should I expect them to lose one? Enjoy the games, ladies and gents!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,666 other followers